Iliad book 3 summary. The Iliad by Homer

HOMER, ILIAD BOOK 3

iliad book 3 summary

The Homeric warriors fight mainly with a large thrusting spear that is sometimes thrown. The Warrior and The Father Upon leaving his brother's home, Hector hurries to find his wife, Andromache, and their baby boy, Astyanax. But the Achaeans came on in silence, breathing fury, eager at heart to bear aid each man to his fellow. He is on an angry mission, however, and he searches pointedly for Hector so that he might avenge the death of his friend Patroclus. Hector wants to kill Achilles because Achilles just killed his little brother. By fighting with Menelaos and abiding by the terms of the truce, Paris could end the war that his actions caused. Family Friend After Hector leaves, Diomed meets Glaucus in an open space.

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The Iliad Notes

iliad book 3 summary

Verily I deemed that I had got me vengeance upon Alexander for his wickedness, but now is my sword broken in my hands, and forth from my grasp has my spear flown in vain, and I smote him not. . Summary: Book 4 Meanwhile, the gods engage in their own duels. Hector exits to meet his adversary but then flees him, running around the city three times. Though Paris sulkily blames his misfortune in the fight on the gods whom he claims aided Menelaus, Homer himself makes no mention of these gods, and the suffering that Menelaus undergoes in the fight suggests that he had no divine help.

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Homer: The Iliad

iliad book 3 summary

The Achaians loudly applaud the decision of their king and commander-in-chief. And whichsoever of us twain shall win, and prove him the better man, let him duly take all the wealth and the woman, and bear them to his home. Helen resists, suggesting that Aphrodite has transported her before against her will, and that she will never go back to Paris. Battle breaks out, and the blood flows freely. Won't he refrain from going back to the battle? The god retaliates and chases Achilles only to be stopped by Hephaestus who repulses him at Hera's bidding.

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Notes on Book 3 from The Iliad

iliad book 3 summary

Both armies look forward to ending the war at last. In fact, Paris does not even try. Agamemnon is encouraged to attack by a dream and after some trouble with his troops, rallies them. On the battlefield, Menelaus looks for Paris up and down the lines, and the Achaeans cry out that Menelaus is the victor, ending the war by oath. Homer maintains his nature simile for armies in this section.

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Homer: The Iliad

iliad book 3 summary

The Trojans propose a settlement. He doesn't insist that the gods only help the Trojans, however, so Hera, Athena, Poseidon, Hermes, and Hephaistos all go to help the Greeks. Verily thou wilt lead me yet further on to one of the well-peopled cities of Phrygia or lovely Maeonia, if there too there be some one of mortal men who is dear to thee, seeing that now Menelaus hath conquered goodly Alexander, and is minded to lead hateful me to his home. Agamemnon now rallies the Achaean ranks. It turns out their families are old friends. Achilles then leaps at Hector, intent on murder - but this time Apollo intervenes, removing Hector to safety. Aye, of that were I fain, and it had been better far than that thou shouldest thus be a reproach, and that men should look upon thee in scorn.

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SparkNotes: The Iliad: Books 3

iliad book 3 summary

Disguised as a Trojan soldier, Athena convinces the archer Pandarus to take aim at Menelaus. After seeing Menelaos's wound, King Agamemnon, ''all eagerness for battle and glory,'' marches through the ranks of soldiers stirring up their courage and anticipation. Helen is with them, and she identifies the Achaian commanders for him and tells him a little about their deeds. With Zeus turned away from the battle, Poseidon inspires Ajax and Idomeneus to fight more fiercely. Glossary Antenor one of the Trojan elders; advises Priam. And Idomeneus over against him standeth amid the Cretans even as a god, and about him are gathered the captains of the Cretans. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander, then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be.

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HOMER, ILIAD BOOK 3

iliad book 3 summary

The greaves first he set about his legs; beautiful they were, and fitted with silver ankle-pieces; next he did on about his chest the corselet of his brother Lycaon, and fitted it to himself. Homer frequently associates the qualities of a god with a character or an action in the poem. Meanwhile the battle continues near Troy. Ajax fights him but the duel is ended by nightfall and a truce. Helen also points out the broader Odysseus and the giant as well as. Not to be flung aside, look you, are the glorious gifts of the gods, even all that of themselves they give, whereas by his own will could no man win them.

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